Monday, June 10, 2019

Top 10 Things I LOVE about Chile!

By Lori Dorchak
1. The breathtaking natural scenery: the Andes with snow capped volcanoes, the rugged Pacific coast, the sparkling blue lakes, and the lush green Valdivian rain forest.From the driest desert in the world, the Atacama, in the north of Chile, to the Mediterranean climate of central Chile,  to the rugged sub-antarctic climate of southern Chile, the diversity is incredible!
Punto Godoy facing south to Isla de Chiloe
2. The clean fresh air that blows up from the Antarctic. It’s some of the cleanest in the world.
The southern hemisphere is a lot less populated and less polluted and the winds from the more polluted northern hemisphere stay there as well as the ocean currents. So it’s a lot cleaner down here!

Rainbow over Petrohue on Lago Todos Los Santos
3. The kind, gentle people of the campo. Country folk are much different than those of the city so I am not speaking for the people of Santiago. But the people in the south of Chile in the country are for the most part kind and helpful and understanding as you stumble through their language!
Plus they love Gringos!
4. The culture is more family oriented. While most Chileans have small families, they admire large families.
The country is not filled with trashy billboards of a questionable nature.
The grocery aisles are not filled with porn and the streets are still safe for children to play and walk home from school unattended.
Celebrating Fiestas Patrias
5. Smaller, less invasive government that doesn’t spend money it doesn’t have.
Less taxes and fees, less rules and regulations. According to the Index of Economic Freedom, the government has shown prudent public financial management, keeping  public debt low and budget deficits under control.
Plus government corruption is the lowest in Latin America.

Military parade in Frutillar Bajo
6. A stable economy that produces more than it consumes. The country exports more than it imports. Chile produces wine, copper, and veggies which are exported all over the world.
This culture is not based on consumption. Life is not about buying and buying, who has the nicest car, and clothes, who is wearing the latest fashions (It may be that way in Santiago but not here). And the quality of life is high. You don’t see much third-world poverty here like in Peru or Brazil.
7. The small town atmosphere where everybody knows everybody. Life is centered around the town plaza where people hang out to socialize. It’s reminiscent of the USA in the 1950’s.
Volcan Osorno on Lago Llanquihue
8. There is little to no social and civil unrest. No race wars. The level of crime here is half of what it is in the USA. though the communists are often causing minor problems in Santiago.
9. You don’t need any vaccinations to visit Chile as there are no tropical diseases and the water is always safe to drink.
10. Great tasting local fresh produce and seafood and the meat is always pasture fed! Little to no fast food here. Comida rapida (fast food) here is picking up a handmade empanada.

11. Less densely populated. With a population of 17.6 million, 1/2 of which is in Santiago, the rest of the country is pretty empty. No traffic jams, except at milking time when the cows cross the road–and no road rage.
12. A rich Christian cultural heritage where religious holidays are national holidays and it’s not illegal to show your faith.
Our Lady of Mt Carmel, Patroness of Chile
13. Inexpensive quality healthcare- $15 to see the doctor at the local hospital with the meds (antibiotics) running about $2-3.
14. Oops! What can I say? I got a little carried away and I could go on with more but I think I already went over my top 10!
Well, I just love Chile 🙂

Friday, May 24, 2019

Bumblebees and Agriculture


Another sad story of how bringing non-native species into an environment that is fairly isolated, like Chile's, can cause problems for the native species like this big beautiful orange bumblebee native to Chile. To read more of the story go to this link from the Guardian and below is another link to the blog "Save our Bumblebee" which is trying to push for legislation to save native species. 



Sunday, March 10, 2019

Chile's plastic bag ban

Before 2018, the plastic bag problem was crazy! Honestly, everywhere I went everyone was over using plastic bags. Everything was always doubled bag because the bags always had holes and sometimes there was only one or two items in a bag. I think we were all drowning in bags!
I was a bit surprised the time I went to the grocery store to discover that they were only going to give me 2 bags for my $200,000 CLP worth of groceries. I only shop once a month and had missed the big news but at least they were slowly weaning us off plastic bags. But it's never an easy transition. You buy reusable bags but invariably forget them so you have to buy more. Boy, the reusable bag makers were making a million (probably the friends of the politicians who enacted this legislation like the yellow vest legislation from 2016) But I admit plastics and the environment is a problem so I'm trying to do my share. Though I am glad to see some more alternatives as of 2019. Someone is now manufacturing paper bags for 500 CLP per bag and many have been using and recycling boxes which are usually free.

A sign reads "Help us help: No more bags. No more plastic bags will be handed out from 1 April 2018 "

Patagon Journal "Possibilities for the future"

BBC Article - "Why some see Chile's plastic bag ban as rubbish"


Chilean President Sebastian Pinera announcing the country's enlargement of the plastic ban. Photo: Gobierno de Chile
President Sebastian Pinera announcing the expansion country wide of the plastic bag ban photo: Gobierno de Chile

Sunday, March 3, 2019

An adventure to Lago Rupanco and the hot spring beach


It was July and the middle of the winter but fairly mild and no rain. A good day for an adventure! 
We had heard about the mysterious and elusive hot spring beach which could only be reached by boat. A beach where if you dug up the sand, the hot springs would come bubbling up. My first thought was "Is it safe?"
I hadn't heard any stories in the news of anyone being boiled alive on any beaches. Our elderly friends had gone and they came back alive and healthy. Then our favorite NZ family came back with all of their kiddos and tales of their magical experience. We had to go but where was the boat? "Well, you just drive out there until you find a boat and then the guy takes you over!" Ok! well that sounds simple enough so we loaded up the car with towels and drinks and snacks and bathing suits and shovels and our 2 workawayers and warm clothes (just in case) after all it was winter.
And so we drove out on the only road that goes along the lake. The lake is 40 km long from west to east and the road is a pretty poor dirt road with lots of curves and lots of pot holes. After a half an hour of bouncing around we found a boat! And it was a ferry boat but it looked suspiciously deserted. We knocked on the door across the street but they were not going out! Not easily deterred we continued our journey. We were rewarded after 10-15 minutes more of driving with a small sign that said
"fletes a las termas" translated  "charter to the hot springs" With a big cheer, we turned in  and went to find the boat.
We found the boat!
For 30,000 CLP or around $45-50 USD we could, all 5 of us, take the boat over. They provide the shovels. So we set off across the lake for a 30 minute ride, our goal in sight. We were dropped off on the black sand beach with a few instructions and the promise that the boat would be back in an hour or two. Everyone started digging and were quickly rewarded. The eastern end was hotter than the western end. And you'd better dig as close to the lake water as you could get because the spring water was HOT!


digging, digging, digging


Letting in some cold water

Yes, I'm burning my feet off and the rest of me is freezing!

Ah, just perfect .... for a minute or two



The end to a magical day

Sunset over Rupanco


For those who may want to visit, here is a link to places to stay with locals. It's a great cultural experience and supports the local economy in Las Gaviotas. (the seagulls) Stays also include fishing and horseback riding.

http://www.chileturismorural.cl/sitio/

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Southern Chile's First WInd Farm


We had heard the rumours...
A wind farm coming to our area
But where?
We wondered why it hadn't been done already.
We knew how windy Chile can get.
Just spend the winter in southern Chile and you will know the power of the wind strong and fresh straight from Antarctica blowing up the coast of the continent.
So we were headed out to Colegual just west of the town of Llanquihue and this is what we saw.




Big beautiful wind turbines. Here are the statistics-

Each tower is 119 meters or 390 feet tall
The blades are 61 meters or 200 feet in length and weigh 14 tons and are made of reinforced fibreglass.
Each turbine is 3 megawatts and with 43 turbines the project, when fully operational,  will have a maximum capacity of 129 MW and will supply clean energy to around 200,000 homes.
The largest wind farm in South America is the El Arrayan in northern Chile and there seem to be plans for several other sites as well in the Coquimbo region north of Santiago and one in the deep south near Punta Arenas.
It is great to see Chile investing in wind and solar energy as energy has been a real problem and Chile and has high costs compared to other South American countries.
Here are a few links for your further reading.

https://santiagotimes.cl/2018/08/25/chile-inaugurates-82mw-punta-sierra-wind-farm/
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-28950685
https://www.evwind.es/tags/chile

Friday, March 23, 2018

The Chilean slowdown and a new president

*Note the update below as of 4/22/2018 with a new video from VisualPolitik

 Presidential elections are held every 4 years and a person can serve more than once but not consecutively. Bachelet, a pediatrician, served from 2006-2010 as a socialist. Then Pinera served from 2011- 2014.Incidentally, during Pinera's term Bachelet served as the first executive director of the newly created  United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women. Bachelet again served from 2014-2108 as president of Chile. November 2017 were the last elections. Like the US, it is just a bouncing back and forth between conservative and liberal and now Pinera is in office as of March 2018. He is a conservative capitalist business man. Watch the video link below and then I will make a few comments.  Note also that this video was produced in June of 2017.






Yes, minimum wage here is abysmally low at only $700 US dollars per month which is about 325,000 Chilean pesos per month. But many jobs in the  farming business also come with a house and power and water are included plus free milk and occasionally meat on a dairy farm. So there are some perks with some jobs. Despite this and the high cost of products, Chileans live well just simply. They don't own a car but the bus system is great. They live and eat simply. The quality of life is good. You would be hard pressed to find a shack with dirt floors and even the simplest most rustic looking cabins have Direct TV, indoor plumbing, and woodstove.
Being the capitalist that I am, the 2nd highest corporate tax rate in the world and the increase on taxation on companies by almost 40%  during the Bachelet presidency has really hurt the Chilean economy and stifled growth.
Less investment by businesses is less growth for the economy and less tax revenue for the coffers. This hurts the government but mostly hurts the people who could be working and making a better life for themselves.
I guess I was not surprised to see the low immigration of foreign professionals. It is hard to start a business here. Before you can even open your doors for business, you have to hire an accountant who will guide you through the maze of documents you need to sign to open your business. Plus the SII, which is the Chilean IRS, I found to be even more repressive than the IRS and we had been audited before. The system is archaic. If you visit the SII office for any length of time, you will see small business owners coming in with boxes and boxes of paper receipts. Every transaction must be recorded with a bolete or factura which must be turned into the SII so you can pay the tax. The SII is trying to switch over to all electronic receipts but the new program is so archaic our Windows 10 computer wouldn't run it. The SII contacted us when we had no receipts one month wanting to know why we hadn't paid our taxes. And try opening a bank account here! You need to have at least your permanent residency. No bank accounts for tourists but even then most banks wouldn't take our money except Banco Estado but then the limitations on the account were so ridiculous you couldn't do much with it. They limit the amount of money you can put in on a monthly basis. Totally puzzling.

Another thing we found puzzling was the difficulty in importing goods. Chile would quickly sink into bankruptcy with out the exports of copper, fruits, veggies, and wine to the US and other countries but any imports have a  26% tax  including those from the US. So much for free trade. These taxes stifle growth.

Here is a quote from a young Chilean

"I am Chilean and I'm 20 years old, my parents always tell me "Son, the Chile you can live in is a paradise, the Chile of our times was a constant fight for survive".

They told me about how in the 70's the people was dying of hunger, my father hardly could find a job to buy some bread, and how those who could leave Chile did it to go to some better country like Sweden or Germany. And it's a little bit hard for me to imagine all of that now, being that I grew up all my life seeing that in Chile we have as problem the overweight, the low-income people are able to donate their money to the neediest in the country, and how people from other good countries like Peru or Colombia come to my country with the hope to find even a better life.

I cannot avoid to feel proud about my country when I think about it, we used to be the worst shit of the whole Americas, but we did progressed when no one thought we could, and now we find out that the rest of the world knows about us, and they consider us one of the best countries of our region.

Perhaps we are not like our brothers of Canada, perhaps we'll never be like our brothers of the U.S.A,. But we are Chileans, we can be proud of it <3"

My comment to this is the reforms from the communist Allende (1970's) to the dictator Pinochet did a lot for the economy. Pinochet tortured and killed many of his political opponents but he did do a lot to establish a free market economy in Chile which has improved the quality of life for all Chileans.
Here is another quote

"As a Chilean I do share some of these points, but the problem is more than just what is shown in the video. The fact that power/money and politics are deeply ingrained in the chilean system, blocks any chance of reform. This marriage between power and politics affects every single party in Chile (from left to right). There's no motivation and incentive for these families to invest in long term solutions, nor they want to, all chilean businesses are focused in short to mid investment, primarily in the extraction of resources. There's no manufacture sector so we, for example, extract copper but then buy copper manufactured products from other countries. We do have several natural resources that could bring revenue if they are then transformed into manufactured products (Like Lithium, Copper, Iron, etc). There's also a big problem with class mobility and general racism among the people. The education system is archaic and quite stagnant for the modern world challenges, and the private education system is not focused in actually guaranteeing a minimum of education for their students, they only seek profits. Our pension system (same as Australia) is not working because there is no protection from the government not help from companies to ensure that their workers have decent pensions once they retire from the active workforce.

What Bachelet tried to do I think was partially correct. But she and her coalition applied the reforms badly. They were badly designed and they were more focused in gaining popularity for the next elections than actually helping the people. The right wing coalition also has not contributed anything to find a solution, and both left and right have gained the ire from the people who are tired of being abused. Both coalitions have deep ties to these families and between them, so corruption is terrible. "


As my closing notes, I would like to say that we love Chile. I don't have many criticisms of the  Chilean people or life here. All is good but no place is perfect. Most governments and politicians have weaknesses and problems. I would like to see Chile grow and prosper but I think growth and prosperity bring their own problems. There is a lot of potential in Chile and hopefully for the sake of the Chilean people, Pinera can open the doors and clear out the stumbling blocks to growth and free trade.

See VisualPolitik's latest video on Chile
Can Pinera resuscitate the Chilean model?


Friday, October 20, 2017

Rental in Los Lagos Region

Interested in trying Chile out with no commitment?
A rental is a great way to experience Chilean life and after your rental contract is over you can move on or stay without the loss of having committed to purchase a property.
This beautiful little 1 bedroom cabin is on 600+ acres on a river - off grid - private - spectacular views - only an hour from Puerto Varas.
Here is the link to our Youtube channel

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

How to make your dreams come true .....

Somewhere over the rainbow
Here is a repost of one of my more popular posts .... 2 combined.

1. Start paying off your debt.

 Debt is servitude. Being in debt ties you to your job because you have to make a certain amount per month just to pay the debt. Here are some scary debt statistics and I hope you aren't one of these!
over 40% of US families spend more than they earn. WOW! that is scary
* the average US household credit card debt is $16,140.
* the average consumer has 3.5 credit cards
*total outstanding consumer debt is $11.34 trillion and includes car loans, mortgages, credit cards, student loans, and personal debt and the numbers keep going up every year!
 I'm no financial expert but we did it buy living simply and cheaper and then using that money to pay off the debt. We drove the same car for 8+ years. We cut up the credit cards. We shopped at Goodwill and Aldi's. We rarely ate out and we rarely bought "toys" and stuff. I enjoyed listening to Dave Ramsey and there are many other financial websites that can help you achieve your financial goals.

2. And then start saving.
Open a savings account, stuff it under your mattress, bury it in the backyard, anything! Just start saving.
It's hard to judge how much you will need to live in a foreign country until you get there. Some places are really cheap. Our friends in Panama tell us how much they pay for stuff and it makes me cringe because things are expensive in Chile. But it is relative. Our friends from New Zealand think Chile is cheap. We lived in South Carolina and to us Chile is expensive. You can check out numbeo.com to see how much things cost in the country you are looking at. Then you should try to save enough money to live on for a year or two while you get yourself established. For Chile, outside of Santiago, a family of 4, living simply, could survive on $3,000 per month. But you have to figure costs if you need a car, buying land or house, sending the kids to private school which is typical here and could cost you $500 USD per month. You may have a retirement check or other monthly income which will be great to keep you going if you have no major expenses like car or house but don't expect to come down and just get a job. Jobs here are low paying for unskilled labor and if you don't speak Spanish you might as well forget it unless you plan to teach English.  Which leads us to ....

3. Get or create a job.
You may have a retirement income or not or just need some extra income. Get or create a job that is not tied to a certain location like telecommuting or an online job. If you are an entrepreneur, there are many opportunities esp. in Chile with its growing economy and stable government and rising incomes. And your 1-2 years worth of savings will give you some time to get some other income going. We have a monthly retirement check we are living off of but we want some more disposable income and we are still young and energetic, at least most days, so we are opening a business here in Chile selling products from the US. Often it just takes some time on the ground living in the country of your dreams and thinking with your entrepreneurial thinking cap to see what opportunities exist.

Next time we will wrap up our list with
4. To Pack your stuff or not to pack your stuff
5. Finding a place to live
6. Buying your airline ticket cause you've made your dreams come true!
And also a few tips on set backs and not getting discouraged because most of your friends will tell you that you are crazy and you'll never do it!

4. To pack or not to pack

Here are some pros and cons for each.

1. To pack by shipping container




In 2013 we bought a 40' seaworthy shipping container for $4,000. We packed it up and then it sat for 9 months in the yard at our duplex which our eldest son was living at. And in the meantime in Chile, we were checking out what we could and could not get here and the prices. So we had our son buy a welder and put it in the container. Then he put some kayaks in and so on. Then we paid $1000. to have it driven to the port of Charleston about 3 hrs away.  We paid $2700. for the boat ride to Concepcion, Chile. which took 3 weeks. We hired an aduana or customs agent to oversee things for us and do all the paperwork and pay all the port fees. This was about $500. Chile has a special deal for new residents- if you ship during your temporary residency you pay less taxes. We met the container at the port where they did a quick inspection and we were on the way with a truck which we hired to bring it to our house about 6 hrs from the port for $2,000. The whole process was pretty smooth and we had no problems. But not always. You can rent your container instead of buying but this puts you on a tight time schedule which can be very stressful! Friends of our had their container detained in the US for a random inspection. 2 weeks later and $2,000., the container was on the way. He was sorry he had done the whole thing. So think about your stuff. Do you have collectibles or valuable things, irreplaceable items, sentimental things you'd prefer not to live without? Specialty equipment for your hobbies or job? Or just a bunch of junk you'd prefer to sell then....


2. If you sell everything, you can use the money to start over once you settle down. 


Cons - You may not find everything you want or think you need once you get here.

Pros - A lot less hassle and expense



           
You can bring some stuff on the airline for free usually 2 suitcases up to 50 lbs and $80 for   any extra but that varies depending on the airline and the time of year you travel.         
 You can ship stuff by postal service. We got a 25 lb box for about $175 and it took 2 weeks. The Chilean postal service has a bad reputation for stealing stuff and sometimes they do        inspect your box. There are usually no importation fees unless you receive a box from a business and then they will charge you 19% IVA tax.

5. Find a place to live

This beautiful cabin is in Frutillar Bajo

We have a friend with a vacation home that they let us live in for almost 2 years but if you don't have a friend like that (sorry, I don't have a vacation home) .....

You could travel around Chile using airbnb.com to find cheap short term rentals. This way you could explore different areas and when you find one you like you could do a more permanent rental on a cabin. Expect to pay $400-500 for a small 1-2 bedroom cabin outside a city. January & February are peak summer vacation times so rentals may be more expensive or even hard to find in some areas. July also may be a busy and expensive time because of winter break. BTW, these are good times to explore Santiago as the residents leave en masse for vacation. I would recommend 6 months to a year in your chosen area before making the commitment to buy anything. 

6. Buy your airline ticket


Expect to pay $800 to $1,000. for a roundtrip ticket from LA, Dallas/Ft Worth, Atlanta, or Miami direct to Santiago on LAN or American. The overnight flight gets you there first thing in the morning on an 8 hr. flight or leave in the AM and get there in time for a late dinner. Chile is usually 1-2 hrs ahead of eastern standard time.

Chile used to charge a reciprocal one time entrance fee to all US citizens of $160. but that was revoked in 2014. A free tourist visa lasts 3 months and can be renewed once for another 3 months but then you have to either leave or apply for temporary residency.


In conclusion. I wrote down our goals with a rough timeline of when I wanted to have certain things accomplished. I checked this list regularly to keep us on track. It helped us to stay focused and take action instead of making excuses. And don't get discouraged because everyone will think you are crazy and will tell you you'll never do it. Best wishes to you all! 


Friday, May 26, 2017

Lot for sale

We now have a lot listed for sale.
It is 11.73 acres or 4.75 hectares of vacant develop-able land with pasture and views located 5 km outside of the city of Osorno.


Please see our Youtube channel Chile Expat Family for a video and more info
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nf_OYI5si0


Monday, December 19, 2016

Farm for Sale

Well, we hadn't planned on going into the real estate business again but.....
When someone comes to you and asks you to help sell their farm, what can you say?
This small dairy farm of 60 hectares or 148 acres is located in the vicinity of Puerto Octay in the Los Lagos region of southern Chile.
It has a fantastic 5 volcano view. See Volcan Osorno below with the house on the right side of the picture.

 The entry to this working farm. They have about 50 cows but the animals and machinery are not going with the farm.
 There are 4 barns including the milking shed.
 Lots of pastureland
 The house is newer and has 5 bedrooms, 1 bath and is around 1300 sq. ft.
 This is the workers house.
 Please see our Youtube video for more info
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8BWqWY_euY

Friday, November 25, 2016

Questions from Readers






I have been getting a lot more emails the past few months from people interested in moving to Chile so I thought I would share some of the questions with my responses here for you.

 what made you go to Chile??

Well, this is what we were looking for
Stable government
Growing economy
Safe
A place where we didn't stick out as the rich gringos
Moderate climate not too dry or too cold or too hot
We went to Uruguay and it was nice but not too impressive
We had friends here in Chile from the USA who owned a vacation home which they let us use  for 2 years until we found our farm
Funny thing is they didn't like Chile and are now back in the USA.


How are the school systems in your area?

Public school is the pits but there are private schools - some free like the catholic school my kids attend. Public schools in my experience have problems controlling the students. Their ideas on discipline and control are a bit different than in the US. The teachers teach to the yearly exit exams mandatory for each grade and text books are revisionist history written by the socialists. Students are not taught to think but just how to follow the steps to achieve the correct answer. All schools have english teachers as there is a big push to get all chileans speaking english but in my opinion they don't start soon enough because most kids graduate not being able to speak english.


How bad are the mosquitoes? Any fear of getting one of the fevers? 

Despite the fact that this area is a temperate rainforest (the Valdivian rainforest) mosquitos and other insects are not really a big problem like in Maine, Minnesota, or Canada.
Remember Chile is not tropical or jungley. It is nowhere near the Amazon so we don't have any of the tropical fevers and diseases you may find in Ecuador or Brazil. Chile is very modern, clean, and healthy. You can drink the water anywhere with no fears. The US State Dept does not have any warnings for travelers to get any immunizations before coming here.

Are there wood burning stoves instead of central heating?

Wood burning stoves are very common or propane heaters. Central heat is very unusual.

Are the locals welcoming at all or do they not want us there?

Locals love us. They think America is great (little do they know!) In the area we live, the Los Lagos region, in 1860 it was settled by thousands of german families so we fit in and most people who don't know us just think we are colonial germans. In places like Ecuador and Peru, you will be targeted as a "rich" American but not here. Chileans are friendly and helpful. My kids had an almost superstar status when they joined our little local school as they had never had american students before.

My hope is to get a job teaching English as a foreign language does that actually sound like a possibility in a not so populated area?

If you want a job teaching in a school, you may need to be certified but I don't know how that works but make sure you have all your documents (look up my article on my blog entitled "Don't leave home without it" and I have a list of all the documents you may need and how to have them apostilled.
We have friends who teach english but it's not in a public school and they seem to live in the cities (Santiago & Puerto Montt). You can do some research on Facebook or online for schools that teach english in Chile. Many businesses that don't have a website often use Facebook for advertising.
There's a course for TEFL (teaching English as a foreign language) but it's only in Santiago I can't find it anywhere south.

Is there lactose free milk or a dairy alternative? my son is lactose intolerant

Chile has dairy companies that produce lactose free milk and yogurt and are found in most larger supermarkets. Lider (walmart) and Jumbo have the best selection of products and the imported (expensive) products from the US. My friend found a new product at Jumbo made in Chile called Nature's Heart Almond Vanilla drink with no sugar. There are more products available in Santiago than here but things are moving and changing here so eventually we should have most products! Also Jumbo has lactose free cheeses.


What is the safest and best way to transfer funds from America to Chile?

As far as money, we use our ATM and debit card everywhere without a problem though ATM fees can be quite hefty. For large sums of money, you can use Western Union or XE.com

Are there any stores for things to get for kids like toys?

Yes, they have toys here :) but anything imported from America is super expensive.

In your opinion what town is best for someone that prefers the cold but also wants the ocean and forest? (Haha so basically I'm being too picky)

No - that is one of the great things about Chile!  Because the country is only 150 miles wide, more or less, You can easily be in the mountains, the forest, and the beach in one afternoon. We prefer green areas as opposed to the dry dusty arid regions around Santiago. We don't like snow and prefer the year round mild temps of the Los Lagos region. 40 F in winter and 60-70F in summer.  We don't like cities so we live out in the country but if you need a job you could live somewhere near Valdivia or Osorno. I'm not as familiar with the other regions.

My husband was wondering besides English teaching, what jobs are there for Americans there that aren't super fluent in Spanish just yet?

Jobs are a difficulty here if you don't speak good spanish so start working on it now! Lots of good online programs. Starting a business here or online are options. Though starting one here won't be easy and you need to be here for a while to figure out what you can do or to fill a need you may find. Tourism is big here and cabin rentals and farming. A hands-on trade like plumbing or electrical work may be a good business as Americans are trusted here and have better knowledge of these fields.
Here are a few tips for you- 
You will need some income or savings while you are getting established. If you live simply, you could make it for a year on $20-30,000 USD
Chile is not one of the cheaper places in SA to live.
We keep our expenses down by living simply like chileans and homesteading to produce a lot of our own needs. We sell pigs and pork and vegies to supplement our monthly annuity income.

Monday, August 15, 2016

An exciting opportunity

We have an exciting opportunity for you to get an 8 year jump start on your dream homestead in the south of Chile.
We are helping some friends sell their homestead near Rio Bueno in the Los Rios Region.
Here are some facts

Property Facts:Rio Bueno, Chile

10 Hectares or 24.7 acres fenced with river frontage

Orchard with 370 Avcllano or Chilean Hazel Nut Trees


+/-2100 Sqft House; 3 Br 2.5 Ba W/Inground pool


House is furnished and stocked

NOTE: House is being being remodeled, but is currently habitable



Care Takers House

John Deere 5400 Tractor w/loader & back hoe attachment
POLARIS 4X4 "Magnum 325" , Roto Tiller (a Big one)
2007 Hyundai 1.7 ton Diesel Truck
Woodchipper, lawnmowers, 2 Containers 40', Every shop tool you could almost imagine,
Kipor 6500 or 5000 watt diesel Generator


All this and more go with property. Everything you need to move in is here.
 To see the video on our Youtube page click here
Video
Or you can email Jim for more info  at
jim.dorchak@gmail.com
The seller is asking $450,000.