Monday, October 14, 2013

Temporary residency

It's official!
We are now temporary residents. Our 90 day tourist visa expired and we had several options.
1. drive to Argentina and pay them $800(for all of us) for the privilege of driving into their country- as US citizens that would be the reciprocity fee for a tourist visa because that is what the US government charges Argentinian tourists to the US - thanks Uncle Sam! - and then come back into Chile on another tourist visa for 90 days
2. renew our 90 day tourist visa for $500(for all of us) here in Chile
3. apply for temporary residency which was FREE!
I think the odds were stacked heavily for option 3. Our friend, Guillermo, brought us down to the foreign office in Osorno and helped us fill out the paperwork. What a blessing he is. Not only is he friends with the ladies who work in this office but he goes through this process regularly with the Mennonites who come down here and it just so happened that he had to go to the office anyway to help a young man who had just arrived from the US. Wow. what timing.
We had to have a notarized copy of a letter stating that we are financially self sufficient. We filled out the one page application and submitted our pictures. We have to submit birth & marriage certificates and bank account statements. And for $200 for all of us, we can become permanent residents in one year.

16 comments:

  1. Congratulations! It seems like your plans are moving forward smoothly. I'm glad it's working out at the lowest posible cost. Thanks for keeping us updated!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Congratulations! Continuing to pray for your success.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks Stacy and Flambeaux.... it is proceeding steadily. What we would really like is our shipping container. That is next.

    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  4. Do you have to wait on permanent residency before importing that?

    ReplyDelete
  5. No it is contrary to common sense. We must order the container prior to receiving our permanent residency in the temporary phase. Which begs the question: "What if I do not get my permanent residency after I order my container and get it here?".

    I do not make the rules...........

    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  6. Awesome. I am soooo glad you will know all the people and tricks when clan hanbury arrives! Sounds like the blessings keep on pouring in!

    ReplyDelete
  7. How long time wise from puerto octay to C to A and B in your other photos?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ok to get from Pto. Octay to our house takes 8 min. To get to Pargua takes 1 hour. For us to get to Frutillar takes 10 min.
    To get down to either ferry (over to Chiloe or down to the lower parts of Chile) you must go through Pto. Montt via Routa 5.

    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  9. What does it mean to them to be financially self-sufficient and how do they want you to prove it? Is there a certain amount of money you have to show them in your bank account? just wondering...
    Congrats on the success of this next phase...
    Jackie

    ReplyDelete
  10. Jackie
    Self sufficient would be the equivalent to around $420 a week in U.S. Dollars or min wadge. If you have social security then you would qualify. It also depends on where you live in Chile, city or rural, sa it is more expensive to live in a city. We have friends who got permanent residency on social security from the U.S. There is no solid rule it is based on several factors. You will need cancelled checks or bank statments.

    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  11. Ok, that makes sense.. we are learning so much thru you all.. thanks for sharing so much... things getting worse and worse here in the states.
    Jackie

    ReplyDelete
  12. What would people do that come there young with no job and not on SS or dont have a pension? Would they be able to get a job in the 3 months to qualify?
    Jackie

    ReplyDelete
  13. Jackie

    Some people come here and get a contract to work. There are people hiring norte americanos to teach english or to do other specialized labor. Some of these companies are set up just for the immigration purposes you need.

    Also the temporary residence lasts one year.

    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  14. Jim, is the income verification per person, per adult "of working age", or per family?

    $400-$500/week per person is a very different sum of money from $400-$500/week for a head of household.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ok here is a little more detailed break down as it was explained to me on the income;

    The Chilean Government basically wants to see that you will not be a burden on them. So they look for you to show or earn the same amount as their minimum wage or approximately $425 per a week per a HOUSEHOLD.

    For me this means that I had to submit a letter stating that I am the sole supporter for my family and that I am responsible for their welfare, food, housing and subsistence. In essence this is what a single bread winner for a Chilean house would be doing.

    Now where it gets a little hairy is they base this on where you live in the country. Obviously IT COSTS MUCH MORE TO LIVE IN ANY CITY IN ANY COUNTRY AND YOU ARE LESS SELF SUFFICIENT IN THE CITY.

    So the Chilean government requires that you earn more where it costs more.

    I have several friends who tech English with no formal teaching background at all (what so ever, nothing, zip, nada.... they are virtual illiterates,,,, ok maybe not, but they are not formal teachers) and they earn what is needed teaching to meet the Chilean requirements.

    Part of this is that there are some employers who are willing to employ North Americans (remember the people in Chile are Americans too just South American and very proud to be so), teaching English under contract.

    SMALL PAUSE! I am looking at the sun setting on the snow covered Vcn Orsono, it is beee yound beautiful

    Ok back to it: If you have a contract it waves many of the residency requirements and also has its specific requirement as stated in the employment contract. This is an easy way to move and stay here. Also it gets you some Spanish lingo as well.

    My Mennonite friends are all here, or were here at first, on contract to work here and they brought their families, lock, stock and barrel, and then converted to permanent residency. I understand that it is not difficult. My worry is that it will get harder and harder as more Norte Americans flee the USA.

    I know that you have more questions, please ask them and I will try to answer them as good as I can. This process is new to me too, and I only know what I have seen and been told as we proceed through the steps. I will say they have been very nice and easy to work with in this Extrajaneros office in Orsono.

    Jim

    ReplyDelete